Riverfront Park

The Clock Tower is all that remains of the Great Northern Train Station which was demolished in the early 1970s in preparation for Expo ‘74. The train depot itself was completed in 1902 and was considered the finest depot west of Chicago. Countless passengers embarked and disembarked at the depot, which served famous passenger trains like the "Empire Builder." The clock tower now stands as a city landmark in the heart of Riverfront Park, the centerpiece of the city.

The EXPO ’74 Plaque commemorates Spokane's hosting of the 1974 world's fair. The idea for a world’s fair in Spokane came in the late 1960s, when 17 acres of railroad land along the Spokane River was acquired as part of a plan to remove railroads from the riverfront and downtown area of the city. Construction on Expo ’74 began in 1972 with the construction of the largest structure, the $11,500,000 U.S. Pavilion. Expo ‘74’s theme was the first to focus on the environment, and Spokane was the smallest city to host an international exposition.

The Looff Carrousel was built in 1904-07 by Charles I.D. Looff of Rhode Island, who built Coney Island’s carrousel, as a wedding gift for his daughter, Emma. It was originally located in Natatorium Park, an amusement park on the bank of the Spokane River, until the park closed in 1968. The carrousel was restored and placed in its new home in Riverfront Park after the close of Expo ’74. A beautiful new building grand opened in 2018 to house the iconic carousel and provides private party/meeting rooms, a gift shop, and gorgeous river views. Take a spin and try to catch the brass ring for a free ride!

Riverfront Park

507 N Howard St
Spokane, WA 99201